10.21.2013

Maquia September 2013 - Part 1


Inspired by Kate the Genius Driveller and her equally genial post of recent Maquia edition, I tried to hunt down a Maquia back issue that I saw a while ago at local Japanese bookstore. Lo and behold, not only the issue is still available, it is a steal at $5 (I think normally $12 here)! This issue came with samples of L'Occitane hair care, but who cares, give me the geeky stuff, please!

Maquia is indeed a makeup geek's nirvana. It is replete full of how-to diagrams to satisfy the inner artist/color-by-number-ist in all of us. Leave it to the wonderful Japanese beauty magazines to invent a new level of makeup precision. It even comes with a pull-out section with millions of geeky tutos, featuring the Fall palettes. Here's just one spread of eye diagrams -- a teaser for part 2 of this blog post's installment.
There are pages and pages of makeup diagrams, just in the small booklet!!

I read an equivalent of first-grader Japanese so, let me take a moment to thank the Driveller Kate herself for tremendous help of translation for this blogpost. She even did a bit of a research behind this story, so ありがとう, Kate!!

The main issue features diagonal makeup. If this is not the stuff of geekiness, I don't know what is.

The makeup artist, Chiharu Iwasaki, explained the inspiration behind this angular theory. She is a retired performer of Takarazuka Revue - a dancing/singing troupe, perhaps a Japanese equivalent to NYC Broadway troupe. Here's a video of Takarazuka performing Romeo and Juliet which is quite impressive! As someone who grew up reading Japanese manga such as Candy Candy or Rose of Versailles (as mentioned by Kate here) this is just right up my alley.

O.k. steering back from my excitement, this 45 degree makeup placement adds dimension to the flat-faced artists due to plaster-like stage makeup (think of the flat-faced Kabuki performers). It is an intentional, exaggeration of 3D-ness of the face. You can see how it applies in stage makeup itself here done by another ex-Takarazuka performer. This Maquia article explains how to translate this theory into real-life makeup.

Whether you read Japanese or not,  the diagrams in this article are very much self-explanatory. Here's a how-to on applying the theory to apply powder blush (G) on step 8, and powder highlighter (H) on steps 9 and 10...


... eye shadow.. overwhelmingly detailed with instructions galore. Step eleven suggests placing the darker shade on the corner at 45 angle upwards, followed by highlight shade in the middle of the moving eyelid on step 12. Step thirteen is to add the dark shade along the bottom lid, again at 45 degree outward from the pupil. The rest of the steps are I think self-explanatory.
Equal-opportunity application calls for finger, brush, and sponge-tip applicator. The humble sponge-tip applicator is growing on me as the tool of choice for applying powdery/glittery shadow. It packs the product nicely and precisely and suitable for highlighting the inner corner on step no. 19. The liners are layered from pencil to liquid/pen liner. A close up detail on the products they use for this tutorial (I only recognize the Tom Ford Quad in 08 Sahara Haze).

... you can even apply the theory on lips. They used NARS Satin Lip Pencil #9204 (Biscayne Park) and MAC Creamsheen in Calypso Bite.

... hair and a 45 degree selfie!
Ahh.. isn't she lovely?

Of particular usefulness is the application of this theory to apply pink shadow. Pink shadow always makes me look like I just got pinkeye, literally.
It directs the placement of bright pink color on the outer 45 degree region of the eye, using finger to blend .. "to achieve graceful look without looking swollen." Who doesn't want that? I tried this using several blush color and the result is quite nice, even for deep-set eyes like mine. 

I hope you have enjoyed this snippet as much as I have had fun with this magazine; there are so many other tips in this one article alone, I wish I can share them all with you! If you have access to a Japanese bookstore, I think this edition is definitely worth a look-see.

10 comments:

  1. i wish i could read it haha. i've never been good at diagrams. LOL!

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    1. Oh? Which part is unclear? Maybe I can help, if it's unclear to you it may also be unclear to anyone else. You just follow the picture, basically.

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  2. <3 <3 <3! Thank you so much for sharing these scans.
    I've been playing a lot with 45 deg angles since and really like the subtle lift they give to my eyes -- I'm used to 'wing up' my eyeshadow/liner for a cat-eye look but placing this angle further inwards on the lid gives a really unusual 'rounded' lift that's really flattering on my hooded eyes.

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    1. Well, thank YOU! Glad the 45 angle works on you. Do you have a spare picture to share? If so, let me know!
      I tried it on my eyes (hooded lids + deep set = wing eater!) and I think it does give an illusion of lift. I also tried the placement of the 45 angle placement of falsies, it looks great without being fake.

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  3. Oh wow, this is really fascinating! I hate math, but I did like geometry. I sort of fancy the idea of doing my makeup with a (imaginary) protractor! I also find ti inspiring to really consider placements instead of just slapping things on and working with them until I find a shape I like :)

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    1. Thanks for stopping by! This article does inspire the geeki-ness in all of us, doesn't it? I hope you find it interesting & maybe inspired to try. Let me know if you do so!

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  4. Hi my dear, can you pls help explain diagram 18 of applying eye makeup... seems like its drawing eyeliner downwards.. thanks so much :)

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    1. That is exactly it. A thin liner at 45 degree angle downwards. See the picture on step 19. Cheers!

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  5. I can't express how much I love this blog post - my dormant makeup geekiness has awakened from hibernation! Thanks for sharing these wonderful scans, and for the translations!

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